Twitter Apology For Porn On Vine

"vine porn"Micro blogging site Twitter has issued an apology after it accidentally posted a pornographic video clip in its Editor’s Picks section of the new video sharing service Vine.

The error has been put down to “human error” by Twitter who posted the six second free porn video clip onto Vine allowing it to be seen without any notice or filters to all the users of Vine.

“A human error resulted in a video with adult content becoming one of the video in Editor’s Picks, and upon realising this mistake we removed the video immediately.  We apologise for the error,” said the official statement from Twitter.

The clip was seen by thousands of people using Vine and led to a barrage of emails being sent to Twitter to complain about the content being posted in this prominent place that allowed users of all ages to see highly adult content not suitable for general release on a site such as Vine.

Vine has been at the centre of complaints about the adult content that has been uploaded already on to the site, days after it becoming available for the public to use.  It seems that Vine and the six second video clips have been harnessed as a new medium for promoters of pornographic material and related websites with hundreds of the video clips finding their way on to the site most with the hashtag #porn.

Since it has become apparent that Vine is a new area for porn to be shown Twitter have issued a warning to its users saying “You may be exposed to content that might be offensive, harmful, inaccurate or otherwise inappropriate.”

The terms continue to say: “All content, whether publicly posted or privately transmitted, is the sole responsibility of the person who originated such Content.  We may, but are not required to monitor or control the Content posted via the services and we cannot take responsibility for such Content.”

Twitter seem to have made sure that they have covered their back when it comes to porn being broadcast in the six second video clips on vine but that will not stop many users being put off using the service for fear of what they may be exposed to without warning.

The internet is filled with many pornographic images and videos but the difference here comes from the fact that usually a user has to consciously chose to search for such material.  Vine has exposed such material to people who may never have made such a search allowing the images to come into family homes and places of work.

avatar DSM Publishing is owned and operated by husband and wife team . They are also the founder and editor of the Affordable Internet Marketing Course and several other publications. Learn more about them here and connect with them on Twitter and Facebook also on Google+
   

1 comment… add one

  • avatar

    cresun7 September 18, 2013, 1:41 pm

    I don’t understand Twitter’s policy on this. Indeed, there is a clear difference between consciously searching for something and being unexpectedly exposed to inappropriate content from browsing a seemingly innocent hashtag or a search result.

    They should respect that the majority of its users presumingly would prefer to not be exposed to disturbing, inappropriate or pornographic content. It’s not what the average user would expect to see when signing up to the service in the first place, and probably even less so would want to see.

    I think it’s rather disrespectful of Twitter to be so ruthless about what they will allow to be posted on their service. They can easily find their porn on a respective pornside, or inappropriate content on other networks that are specifically dedicated to such.

    In brief terms, I would say that their current policy is morally corrupted for having no restrictions as to what is publically and socially acceptible content, considering what they are and have become as an open social network service.

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